Q

Revision as of 20:47, 25 January 2017 by Clive.mckeef (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ←Older revision | Current revision (diff) | Newer revision→ (diff)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ


Contents

Quakers

Permissible in stories about the Religious Society of Friends. Spell out the full name if the story is about the religious movement or its activities.

quarter-final

Hyphenated.

queen

Queen Elizabeth at first reference and the queen or Queen Elizabeth at second reference.

quip

The president/prime minister quipped... is a phrase almost invariably followed by something that is not funny. Avoid both quip and third-rate humour.

quite

Avoid. It can be expressed more clearly and it is ambiguous. In American usage it means very and in European usage it can mean just a little or only moderately.

quotations

Quotes personalize stories and add color to other evidence provided by data or logical argument.

Be sure that the quotes you use support the thrust of the story and are not just decoration. Also aim for quotes that are representative of the range of opinion on the subject in question rather than being used to selectively support one party or the other.

Quotes are sacred. Do not alter anything put in quotation marks. Avoid fragmented quotes unless the words are unusual, contentious or colourful. If the words omitted are at the end of a sentence and are followed by another sentence in quotation marks, then the next word is capitalised to show the start of a new sentence. “We will fight and we will win ... We will never surrender.” You may drop words in this way only if the deletion does not alter the sense of the quote.


To background or explain a quote, do so in a separate paragraph or by bracketing a phrase into the quoted remarks, e.g. He said: “They (the Khmer Rouge) are bound to fail.” Note that Reuters does not use square brackets for interpolated material but parentheses.

When quoting the same source for a lengthy statement there is no need to repeat the source paragraph by paragraph as long as there is no doubt who is speaking.

Avoid quotes in colloquial or parochial language not easily translated or understood in other countries. If you do give such quotes, explain what they mean, e.g. He said: ’Clinton is behind the eight ball (in a difficult situation)’. As in previous example, the full stop goes inside the quotation marks in American English but outside in British English. Use single quotes in headlines and subheads; use double quotes in header bullets. If a quote is translated into English from a foreign language, make sure it makes sense and reads well in English.  

Powered by MediaWiki
GNU Free Documentation License 1.2